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Old 01-24-2007, 12:02 AM
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Default High Fructose Corn Syrup: Bad, Good, or in Between?

It’s sweeter than sweet and inexpensive to boot, so food and beverage manufacturers use high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in virtually everything they make––from soft drinks (including “fruit” drinks) to jams, crackers, bread, yogurt, salad dressing, and even soup. Some research has suggested that fructose is not metabolized in the same way other sugars are, and that the proliferation of HFCS may be a contributing factor in our country’s obesity problem. But many experts believe it is no worse than any other sweetener; in fact, last July The New York Times called it “a sweetener with a bad rap.” So is this syrup the demon culprit behind obesity or wrongly accused?

Sweet and Evil
In 2004, researchers published an article in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, concluding “there is a distinct likelihood that the increased consumption of HFCS in beverages may be linked to the increase in obesity.” In this article, they explain that fructose does not stimulate the pancreas to release insulin and, in turn, does not trigger the secretion of the hormone leptin, which is instrumental in making us feel satiated. These researchers also point to the fact that the increased use of HFCS in the United States mirrors the dramatic increase in obesity. HFCS now accounts for more than 40 percent of the caloric sweeteners added to food and drinks.

HFCS Defense
This and other attacks on HFCS prompted the Corn Refiners Association to create a website, “HFCS Facts,” debunking myths and defending the sweetener. One point they make is that HFCS is not actually “high” in fructose. It contains either 42 or 55 percent fructose and the rest is mostly glucose. The proportions are roughly equivalent to table sugar, which is 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose.

The Times article quotes two gurus in the field of nutrition both saying they do not believe there is evidence to support the idea that HFCS has uniquely contributed to the obesity epidemic. And when the Times reporter interviewed one of the authors of the 2004 journal article, the researcher said the idea of a unique link between HFCS and obesity was just a theory and that it could well be proved wrong with future science.

Diabetes and Fructose
What about those with diabetes? On the surface, it would seem that a sugar that doesn’t raise blood glucose and insulin would be a godsend for people with diabetes. However, like most things, it’s not that simple. First, fructose is combined with glucose and other sugars to make HFCS. Second, in animal studies, rodents fed large amounts of fructose became insulin resistant (a precursor to diabetes) and developed high triglycerides. Combine this with the idea that fructose may suppress the release of the appetite-regulating hormone leptin and you’ve got a prescription for upping obesity and diabetes risks.

The bottom line: Whether it’s table sugar, honey, or a highly processed sweetener like HFCS, added sugar is something we’re better off without––no matter what your health status. Get your sugars from natural, healthy sources and you can’t go wrong.

from dLife
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Old 01-24-2007, 06:19 AM
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Thanks Magie. This subject seems to get some people "riled up". DD was able to get off a prescription medication after eliminating this man made chemical from her diet. Other countries do NOT put this in their food. If it is a concern for you read the labels. All sweetened soda pop is water and HFCS.
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Old 01-25-2007, 06:41 PM
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thanks for the good article
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Old 12-03-2007, 04:36 AM
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Thumbs up Seattle Grocer Bans High Fructose Corn Syrup

Seattle Grocer Bans High Fructose Corn Syrup

No other country puts this stuff in their "food".
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Old 05-14-2008, 03:47 PM
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Exclamation High-Fructose Corn Syrup: The Controversy Continues

May 12, 2008

High-Fructose Corn Syrup: The Controversy Continues

Amy Campbell
Last week (in "A Foray Into Fructose"), we learned how fructose, or fruit sugar, may be linked to certain health conditions, such as high lipid levels, gout, kidney stones, and irritable bowel syndrome. What we haven't looked at yet, but will this week, is a substance that has just about as bad a reputation as trans fat, or pesticides, or even global warming: high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS, for short).
HFCS was introduced into the American diet back in the 1970's. As its name implies, this sweetener is made from corn, and is made up of varying amounts of fructose, depending on whether it's used in, say, soft drinks or baked goods. HFCS is similar in sweetness to sucrose (table sugar), making it a good choice for food manufacturers.
You may be wondering why a food manufacturer would use HFCS over regular sugar. Well, there are several reasons for this:
  • HFCS is generally cheaper to use than table sugar.
  • HFCS prolongs the shelf life of food products.
  • HFCS maintains moisture and freshness.
So why is a pretty innocuous-sounding substance at the source of so much controversy?
HFCS and Obesity
Over the past several years, the media has hyped up stories linking the rise in obesity in the U.S. to a high intake of HFCS, primarily in the form of sweetened beverages. According to the American Dietetic Association, the claim is that fructose alters "hormonal patterns" that promote appetite and storage of fat in the body, compared to regular sugar and other types of sweeteners.
No one's arguing that HFCS is a source of additional, empty calories in the diet and that we need to cut down on our intake. About half of the added sugar intake of the average American comes from HFCS. And soft drink intake has significantly increased over the past 50 years. What's the main ingredient in soft drinks? HFCS. Therefore, with obesity rates climbing, and soft drink intake climbing, it's not too hard to see how the two might be linked. However, the catch is that no good research has been done proving that HFCS somehow alters metabolism to increase appetite and promote fat storage.
The causes of obesity are complex and likely multifold. It would be easier if we could just point the finger at consuming too much HFCS, or too much fat, or our inactive lifestyles. Those are very likely culprits, but they aren't the only ones. At this point, there isn't enough credible evidence that HFCS is a cause of obesity.
HFCS and Diabetes
Last year, researchers at Rutgers University concluded that HFCS may contribute to the development of diabetes in both adults and children. They looked at 11 different sodas that contained HFCS and found high levels of reactive carbonyls in them. Reactive carbonyls are substances that can cause tissue damage, are found in high levels in people with diabetes, and may be at least partially responsible for inducing diabetes. They also discovered that adding antioxidants from tea to these beverages reduced the number of reactive carbonyls and that these tea substances may help reduce the "toxic" effect of soft drinks.
You can imagine that the American Beverage Association, the Corn Refiners Association, and other food industry members have hotly disputed all the so-called "evidence" that HFCS causes health problems. While the evidence may not yet be strong enough to truly support claims of obesity and diabetes, it's a wise idea to go easy on foods that contain HFCS. Here's a partial list of foods to be wary of:
  • Most sweetened sodas and other soft drinks
  • Some fruit juice drinks (i.e., fruit juice "cocktails")
  • Bottled pasta sauce
  • Ketchup and barbecue sauce
  • Cereals
  • Canned soup
  • Canned fruit in syrup
  • Frozen entrées
As always, read food labels and find out, in addition to carb and fat grams, what kinds of ingredients are in your food. Try to choose foods that are as unrefined as possible, as often as possible. Your body will thank you.
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Old 05-15-2008, 01:45 PM
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Thanks for sharing! I hate that hfcs is in almost everything. I was horrified when i saw it in the gerber kids snacks & toddler formula. I try to avoid what i can but sometimes i just have to have a reese's and a dr pepper
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Old 08-16-2008, 08:51 AM
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Lightbulb The Big Chemical High Fructose Corn Syrup vs. Sugar Debate

http://www.thenewstribune.com/busine...ry/437957.html
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Old 08-16-2008, 09:38 AM
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If on the label it says frutose in oneof the first couple of ingredients that is sugar in disguse..
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Old 11-01-2008, 07:40 PM
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Default Does Fructose Make You Fatter?



High-fructose corn syrup is a sweetener used in many processed foods ranging from sodas to baked goods. While the ingredient is cheaper and sweeter than regular sugar, new research suggests that it can also make you fatter.
In a small study, Texas researchers showed that the body converts fructose to body fat with “surprising speed,” said Elizabeth Parks, associate professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. The study, which appears in The Journal of Nutrition, shows how glucose and fructose, which are forms of sugar, are metabolized differently.
In humans, triglycerides, which are a type of fat in the blood, are mostly formed in the liver. Dr. Parks said the liver acts like “a traffic cop” who coordinates how the body uses dietary sugars. When the liver encounters glucose, it decides whether the body needs to store it, burn it for energy or turn it into triglycerides.
But when fructose enters the body, it bypasses the process and ends up being quickly converted to body fat.
“It’s basically sneaking into the rock concert through the fence,” Dr. Parks said. “It’s a less-controlled movement of fructose through these pathways that causes it to contribute to greater triglyceride synthesis. The bottom line of this study is that fructose very quickly gets made into fat in the body.”
For the study, six people were given three different drinks. In one test, the breakfast drink was 100 percent glucose. In the second test, they drank half glucose and half fructose; and in the third, they drank 25 percent glucose and 75 percent fructose. The drinks were given at random, and neither the study subjects nor the evaluators were aware who was drinking what. The subjects ate a regular lunch about four hours later.
The researchers found that lipogenesis, the process by which sugars are turned into body fat, increased significantly when the study subjects drank the drinks with fructose. When fructose was given at breakfast, the body was more likely to store the fats eaten at lunch.
Dr. Parks noted that the study likely underestimates the fat-building effect of fructose because the study subjects were lean and healthy. In overweight people, the effect may be amplified.
Although fruit contains fructose, it also contains many beneficial nutrients, so dieters shouldn’t eliminate fruit from their diets. But limiting processed foods containing high-fructose corn syrup as well as curbing calories is a good idea, Dr. Parks said.
“There are lots of people out there who want to demonize fructose as the cause of the obesity epidemic,” she said. “I think it may be a contributor, but it’s not the only problem. Americans are eating too many calories for their activity level. We’re overeating fat, we’re overeating protein and we’re overeating all sugars.”
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Old 11-02-2008, 10:21 AM
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Great info-I can't believe how many foods contain this--even 100% whole wheat breads much of the time---read those labels!
thanks for sharing!
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